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Your first step to recovery

Osteoporosis

 

Osteoporosis is a condition which results in weak and brittle bones- to such degree that a fall or even mild stresses like coughing or bending over may result in a fracture. Bones are living tissues which are continually being broken down and replaced. However, your bones become osteoporotic when the formation of new bone does not keep up with the loss of old bone. This condition typically develops over time without any pain or other major symptoms, and is generally not diagnosed until you have sustained a fracture. The hip, pelvis, upper arm, spine and wrists are the most common structures affected by osteoporosis- related fractures.

 

 

How do you know if you have Osteoporosis?

 

Because there are no obvious early warning signs and symptoms, it is difficult to pre-diagnose osteoporosis. You may be unaware that you have this condition perhaps till you have one of the following:

  • Sustained a fracture from an incident more easily than you should have- like a simple fall or a bump
  • A decrease in the height of your spinal vertebrae over time
  • Change in posture – stooping or bending forwards
  • Back pain, due to a fractured or collapsed vertebra

Please see your doctor if you experience the following:

  • If you are over the age of 50 and have sustained a fracture
  • Sustained a spine, wrist, or hip for the first time
  • Sustained a fracture more easily than you should have (a simple fall or after a slight bump)

 

Risk factors

Key factors which may increase your risk of developing osteoporosis include:

  • Females- particularly post-menopausal Caucasian and Asian women
  • Over the age of 50
  • Excessive consumption of caffeine or alcohol
  • Smoking
  • Having a smaller or petite body frame
  • Poor physical activity levels and leading a very sedentary lifestyle
  • Family history of osteoporosis
  • Having low levels of vitamin D and poor dietary calcium intake
  • Decreasing levels of testosterone with ageing in men
  • Estrogen deficiency in women (irregular periods, early (before turning 40) or post-menopausal, surgical removal of the ovaries)
  • Use of long-term medication such as thyroid and epilepsy medications, corticosteroids
  • Having medical conditions such as gastrointestinal diseases; endocrine diseases; rheumatoid arthritis; cancer; and blood disorders

 

 

How will you be diagnosed?

Your doctor will review your signs and symptoms, family and medical history. You may be referred on for a specialized X-ray or CT scan to evaluate the bone density to help diagnose osteoporosis. Your bone density will be classified by comparing it to the typical bone density for a person of equivalent gender, size, and age.

 

 

How is Osteoporosis treated?

The treatment pathway chosen for the management of this condition is dependent on results of your bone density scan, gender, age, medical history and severity of the condition. Potential treatments for osteoporosis may include exercise, making positive lifestyle changes, vitamin and mineral supplements, and medications. Please consult your doctor for appropriate advice and treatment options.

 

 

How can Physiotherapy help?

 

Your physiotherapist will help you strengthen your bones and your muscles through a personalized and graduated rehabilitation program. Components of this rehabilitation program may include weightbearing aerobic exercises, resistance training using free weights/resistance bands/bodyweight resistance, and exercises to enhance posture, balance and body strength. Your physiotherapist will work with you to find activities that suit your needs and as per your physical activity level.

 

 

EASY STRETCHES DESK STRETCHES

Sitting at a desk working, studying or surfing the net for long hours at a time makes it extremely difficult to maintain proper posture. That’s because our bodies are not designed for hours of idle sitting. So as the clock gets ticking many of us have the tendency lean forward, slouch our shoulders and hunch our backs.

Unfortunately, this increases pressure on multiple areas in your body. This explains why most of us experience pain and stiffness in our neck, shoulders, back and in some cases your tailbone!

So what do I need to do you ask?

The answer is simple, STAND, MOVE AND STRETCH!

It sure does sound easier said than done, especially if you are pressed with time to complete set work tasks. BUT the good news is that stretching or moving is a buildable habit that can be easily implement as you work. It doesn’t take long!

For starters set an alarm to take micro 2–3-minute break for every 20-30 minutes. Use this time to stand up, walk over to a colleague, go for a toilet break, drink water or make yourself tea or a coffee.

Or try out these simple easy stretches while you sit or stand at your desk

So let’s get started!

SPINAL TWIST:

  • Sit up tall, relax your shoulders
  • Cross one leg over the other, then place your opposite elbow on your top thigh.
  • Take a deep breath and as you exhale slowly twist your body (not your neck) and look over your shoulder.
  • Hold for 10 seconds.
  • Slowly return to resting position and repeat on the other side.

BACK ARCHES

  •  Sit tall, set your feet flat on the ground hip-width apart.
  • Rest your hands behind your hips, then slowly arch your back as you gently tilt your head back.
  • If you experience pain or discomfort in your neck or tingling in your arms – do this stretch without head tilt.
  • Hold for 10 seconds, return to start and repeat

ARM REACHES 

  • Sit up tall with your feet flat on the ground.
  • Interlace your fingers and stretch your arms straight as you turn your palms up to the ceiling.
  • Hold this position for 10 seconds and repeat

SHOULDER CIRCLES

  • Sit or stand up tall, feet hip width apart
  • Relax your arms and shoulder, begin by rolling your shoulder backward in a circular motion.
  • Do this 5 times, repeat forward circles

NECK CIRCLES

  • Sit or stand up tall, with feet planted flat on floor
  • Slowly begin to roll your head in a clockwise position
  • Do this 20 seconds, then repeat in a counterclockwise direction

CHEST STRETCH

 

  • Stand close to wall or a door frame
  • Place your forearm in a 90-degree angle at shoulder height.
  • Take one step forward on the leg closest to the wall and slowly rotate your chest away until you feel a stretch across your chest.
  • Do not hunch or round your shoulders.
  • Hold the stretch for 20 seconds, repeat
  • Do this both for both sides

BACK EXTENSIONS

  • Stand with your legs at hip width apart and straight.
  • Place your hands on your hips.
  • Lean your body backwards, trying to arch in the lower back as much as you can, lifting your chest up towards the ceiling.
  • Try to avoid allowing your hips to swing forwards too far.
  • Hold this position for 10 seconds, return to start position & repeat 5 times.

 FLOOR REACHES

  • Sit on a chair with upright posture
  • Slowly bend forward to plant your hands on the floor.
  • Hold for 10 seconds, return to start

SHOULDER BLADE SQUEEZE

  • Start in an upright position.
  • Practice bringing your shoulder blades back and down.
  • Picture gently drawing your shoulder blades towards the centre of your lower back.
  • This is a subtle movement, ensure you do not over strain your shoulder blades when performing this action.
  • Hold for 10 seconds, repeat 3-5 times

SHOULDER BLADE STRETCH

  • Clasp your hands together and hold them in front of your body.
  • Push your arms as far forward as you can whilst rounding your shoulder blades.
  • Gently drop your chin down to your chest.
  • Hold this position while you feel a stretch between your shoulder blades.

 WRIST STRETCHES

  • Stretch out your arm straight in front of you with your palm facing away
  • Use your opposite hand to gently pull your palm back
  • Hold for 5 seconds, repeat with your palm facing your body

Meet Your Body Parts!

Here are definitions of common terms for body parts you may hear your doctor or physio use!

 

Ligaments

Ligaments are cordlike extensions that serve to connect ends of two bones to form a joint. They are made up of strong, durable, slightly elastic bandlike structures comprised of collagen fibres. The structural make up of ligaments is advantageous providing joint stability by limiting excessive movement.

What are Ligaments? (with pictures)

Tendons

Similar to ligaments, tendons contain densely packed bundles of tough collagen fibres that hold muscles together to the bone. They are located at the ends of every muscle in the human body. Bound together in tight sheaths they are made to withstand tension and transmit forces exerted by the muscle to the bone to cause movement.

 

10 Facts About Tendons | Physio Direct - Rural Physio at Your Doorstep

Muscles

Human body is made up of over 600 muscles categorised into three different types – cardiac, smooth and skeletal muscle.

  • Cardiac muscle – is only found in the walls of the heart. Its contractions help propel blood through the blood vessels to all part of the body.
  • Smooth muscle – is found mainly in the lining of internal organs (except the heart) including digestive and uninary tract organs, blood vessels. Smooth muscle works to transport substances through the organs by alternately contracting and relaxing.
  • Skeletal muscles – Skeletal muscles are the most abundant type of muscles that form the flesh of the body. They are attached to bones of the skeleton by tendons. They are responsible for voluntary movements of body. Facial expression, mobility, postural control and breathing are some of the movements we observe when skeletal muscles are subjected to voluntary control.

 

Muscle types — Science Learning Hub

Bones

Skeletal system of the human body is made up of 206 bones. Bones are most involved in providing an architectural framework by providing body shape, support and protection of vital organs and for locomotion. Besides these functions, bone is a reservoir for mineral and fats as a source of stored energy and formation of blood cells. Bones are classified by their shape as long, short, flat and irregular. They are connected by ligaments to form joints.

Let's learn about bones | Science News for Students

Cartilage

There are three different types of cartilage found in the human body – hyaline, elastic and fibrocartilage. Hyaline cartilage is the most common cartilage in the human body. It covers the ends of most bones at movable joints, connects ribs to the breastbone, forms the voice-box and nasal passages. It  consists of high water content that provides resilience to withstand great compressive forces found predominantly in joints.

 

What Is Cartilage?

The myth about foot pronation (flat foot)

Myth: Foot pronation(flat foot) is the enemy.

Quest - Article - Surgery Sometimes, Bracing Often, Caution Always |  Muscular Dystrophy Association

In the foot, pronation should occur naturally when the foot comes into contact with the ground. Pronation will appear as the foot rolling inward and the arch flattening.

What are the benefits?

  • Dissipates the force that the foot receives from the ground

  • Allows the foot to become a stable and mobile adaptor to enhance movement opportunity

  • Loads the muscles of the extensor chain (calf, quads, glutes) to convert ground reaction forces into forward momentum so we can propel efficiently.

So why have I been told this is bad?

So as you are now aware, pronation is very normal and a critical movement to ensure we move and propel ourselves forward efficiently.

What you may have heard someone say to you is that you ‘overpronate’?

Firstly, overpronation is subjective and not as black and white as it is sometimes made out to be. Overpronation has be defined as: ‘a foot that rolls inward toward the arch excessively’.

Foot Pronation: Underpronation & overpronation explained- The Foot Clinic

What we must understand is that a pronation can only happen when the foot has a stable tripod on the ground. This means that the calcaneus (heel bone), 1st metatarsal (big toe knuckle), 5th metatarsal (little toe knuckle) must all remain in contact when the foot rolls inwards and the arch flattens.

The Foot Tripod - Fix Flat Feet

So, If you have been told you are ‘overpronated’ , it is most likely that your whole foot is ‘everting’ NOT ‘overpronating’.

What is Eversion?

Eversion can be defined as: ‘the process of turning inside-out’.

In pronation your heel must naturally ‘evert’ (sole of the heel will move away from the midline of the body) NOT your whole foot.

If your ‘whole foot’ everts (turns out) you will no longer have a stable foot tripod as the 5th metatarsal (little toe) will lose contact with the ground.

The key to ensuring this does not happen is to provide an environment for the bones of the midfoot (middle of the foot) and forefoot (toes) to experience the opposite motion to that of the heel. This will mean that the foot has an opportunity to truly pronate with a tripod on the ground.

 

 

So how can you help me do that?

  • At Physio fusion we can help you to bring your own body into alignment and create an environment in which the healing can begin

  • Foot strengthening exercises

  • Footwear advice

  • Referral to other healthcare specialists for further assistance (e.g. podiatrists)

To find your nearest Physio Fusion clinic and book an appointment call 09 6266186 or visit our website https://physiofusion.co.nz

Pressure on the Spine in Different Posture

Did You Know?

 

Low back pain is a common health problem which affects up to 80% of the population at some stage in their life.

 

In New Zealand ACC spends in excess of $130 million a year treating back pain related injuries.

Most back pain occurs between the ages of 25 and 60, and most typically in the 40s.

 

 

 

In an era of smart devices, posture has never been more important or harder to achieve. As technology continues to grow, sitting at a desk on a computer or on our phones is becoming more prevalent at work. Having a sedentary desk job can result in sitting for around 8 hours a day. This position actually increases the load on your spine more than standing. Spinal pressure “sits” around 140mm pressure. This pressure usually does not hurt the back right away however, builds up over time and can even change the structure structure of your spine. So, if you slouch then spinal pressure increases to 190mm; add some weight and you’ve put 275 pounds of pressure on your spine.

 

A compromised spine constricts your blood vessels and nerves, causing problems with your muscles, discs, and joints. And all of these problems can lead to headaches, fatigue, and even breathing problems. Your back is a delicate machine. When one part falls out of alignment, it can affect everything setting off a domino effect and wreak havoc throughout your back and body.

 

 


Below is a graph showing different postures and the pressure it exerts on the spine;


But, remember: While you may feel comfortable and supported in your chair and find a perfect sitting posture, staying in the same position for long periods is not healthy for your spine. Varying your postures by occasionally standing and moving around for at least a few minutes each half hour will help keep your spinal joints, muscles, tendons, and ligaments loose and pain free.

 

Stand Up for Your Spine

If you don’t have a sit-stand desk, you can still combat “sitting disease” and protect your spine. Consider these tips:

  • Do some work standing at a high table or counter.

  • Use a lumbar roll behind your back when sitting to improve seated posture

  • Set a timer on your computer for a stand-and-stretch break every 30 minutes.

  • Exercise to assist in improving body weight to lessen additional load on the spine

  • Strengthen the core to provide additional support

The focus is simple: Reduce your sitting throughout the day. But, remember that varying postures is best for your back and neck, so do not go the opposite extreme and never sit. Alternating sitting, standing and movement throughout your day is the best way you can keep your spine safe and body healthy—at work and beyond

 

Still having back pain?

Schedule an initial assessment with one of our Physiotherapists so they can determine the root of the problem.  During this assessment your physiotherapist will be able to decide whether your pain is a source of nerve root irritation, discogenic, postural related, or musculoskeletal.  After arriving with the consensus of the problem, we will be able to use many techniques to relieve the back pain.  These include: manual therapy, therapeutic exercise, and postural recommendations.

 

To find your nearest Physio Fusion clinic and book an appointment call 09 6266186 or visit our website https://physiofusion.co.nz

Exercises you can do during lockdown

I know how hard it can be when it comes to working out and its really easy to find an excuse to avoid lockdown workouts but it’s not just about staying in shape its also about keeping active to feel mentally strong. We know that exercise does wonders for mental health and at a time where its all uncertainty, anxiety, and a daily dose of doom and gloom, we all need to work out that frustration somewhere!

If you’re struggling with a lack of motivation or negative mindsets there’s only one way to turn it all around: Take :boom: ACTION :boom:

 

How much exercise is enough?

You’ve heard the saying something is always better than nothing and that’s the case when it comes to exercise. The current recommendation for adults according to Best Exercises for Health and Weight Loss.org is to aim for 150 minutes of moderate intensity activity every week (or 75 minutes of vigorous intensity) with two sessions of strength building activities per week. That’s about 30 minutes of movement, five times per week.

This is a quick full body routine:

Bodyweight Squats

Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart. Engage your core muscles and gently squat down. As you squat, bend from your hips. Keep your back straight as you push your hips back and counterbalance by leaning your torso forwards. Keep your knees aligned with your toes. Your weight should be evenly on your heels and the balls of your feet, not your toes. It might help to image your are trying to sit down in a chair that is too far away from you. Tense your bottom muscles at the bottom of the squat and keep them tense as you straighten back up to the start position.

Arm dips

Start in a seated position. Place your hands on the seat of the chair and use your arms to move yourself forwards towards the front of the chair. You will need to move your feet further forwards to help your stability. From this position, use the strength of your arms to slowly lower your body directly down towards the floor and then raise yourself back up. Do not actually sit on the floor and keep your hands close in beside you. Relax and repeat.

 

Lunges

Stand straight with your arms to the side or on your hips. Take a large step forwards on your affected leg, then drop your hips directly down between both feet, bending your hips and knees to a 90 degrees. Push back up to the starting position, and repeat. Make sure you take a large enough step that your front knee does not travel over your foot, and ensure your knee travels directly forwards. Keep your body up straight throughout the movement.

 

Mountain Climbers

Adopt a plank position insuring your hands are directly beneath your shoulders.
Fully flex one hip and hold.
Extend the bent leg to the rear and repeat the movement pattern on the opposite side

 

How to stay Healthy and Sane during Lockdown

 

The restrictions and change brought by the outbreak of COVID-19 has resulted in a great deal of control being taken from our hands; this has been anxiety provoking for many of us. Nevertheless, it’s important to re-evaluate, acknowledge and place focus upon the matters that we DO have control over so that we can gain our personal power back!

 

Lockdown Productivity Tips

 

 

Check in with yourself: how is your body and mind feeling. Embrace your emotions and give yourself permission to feel the way toy do.

:large_blue_diamond: Stay connected: Social connection is inevitably limited at the moment but catching up with people via text or facetime will help prevent feelings of isolation.

:large_blue_diamond: Maintain some form of routine: Maintaining a routine helps provide some structure do days which often all seem to merge into one.

:large_blue_diamond: Get fresh air where possible: Daily fresh air can provide an easy change of scenery when we are stuck at home most of the day.

:large_blue_diamond: Gentle exercise is a MUST!

:large_blue_diamond: Stay Hydrated: Drinking enough water is important to keep your body hydrated and makes sure your body functions properly.

:large_blue_diamond: Eat well- You’d be surprised how your diet can affect how you feel. Gut health in particular is linked to mental health.

:large_blue_diamond: Get to that “thing” you’ve been delaying for months

:large_blue_diamond: Pick up a good book

:large_blue_diamond: Learn new habits or rediscover old ones

:sparkles: These may seem like simple strategies but sometimes it’s the simple things that are most effective :sparkles:

“One day this will all be over and we will be grateful for life in ways we never felt possible”

The gratitude we will have for the things we once took for granted will be unmeasurable- getting on a plane, an impromptu visit to the cinema, a shopping spree, going to the gym, even meeting a friend for lunch at a café. Keep going, nothing lasts forever and we have so much to look forward to. In the mean time take each day as it comes, be kind, support those who are struggling and keep going! You are stronger and more resilient than you know!

Lifting Mechanics

IS IT DANGEROUS TO LIFT WITH A BENT BACK?

One common belief about lifting is that rounding your back when lifting an object is considered dangerous while lifting with a straight back is considered safe…

 

 

However, there is a lot of misinformation circulating around lifting mechanics and what is deemed “good technique” versus “bad technique.”

Here are some key myths and misinformation that you may have heard:

 

A ROUNDED BACK WHILE LIFTING OVER STRESSES THE BACK MUSCLES AND LIGAMENTS

  • Research has shown that regardless of lifting position, whether you’re stooped, squatting or weightlifting, your back has to produce the same amount of force. Statistically speaking, it’s not significantly different.

 

 

FLEXING THE SPINE WHILE LIFTING INCREASES THE LOAD ON THE LUMBAR DISCS

  • Under heavy loads, discs are unlikely to fail unless >95% flexion is achieved (which is near impossible)

  • With low loads, the disc is unlikely to fail unless you do thousands of repetitions continuously

  • Your body is an amazing adapter, this includes discs! Your discs can adapt and become more and more able to handle loads when stressed appropriately

 

THESE COMPOUND TO CAUSE INJURIES AND PAIN TO THE BACK MUSCLES AND DISCS

  • Resistance training has demonstrated through countless studies the ability to increase bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine. BMD is actually positively associated with the strength of the spinal discs and ligaments at that level. With appropriate loading and training, disc, ligament, bone and muscles are going to adapt favourably

 

A NEUTRAL SPINE IS SAFER, STRONGER, MORE EFFICIENT AND BETTER TO LIFT WITH

  • There is no significant difference between activities that encourage more spinal flexion and one’s that do not in the long term

  • Lifting with lumbar flexion is not a risk factor for low back pain

  • Research has shown lifting with a bent back is more metabolically and neuromuscularly efficient

  • When the spine is in extension during bent over activities, the hip is actually flexed to a greater degree – decreasing the ability for the glutes and hamstrings to create as much internal torque. Flexing the spine reduces this effect and reduces the moment arm for the hip extensors

 

STOP BACK PAIN & INJURIES BY LIFTING WITH A NEUTRAL SPINE

  • Your lumbar spine flexes every time your hip flexes! It is impossible to isolate one versus the other. It is also impossible to not flex while doing common movements

  • Extreme flexion however (>/=100%), may pose an increased risk under heavy loads, but not at light loads

 

You may still be wondering why you have back pain (stay tuned for our next blog!). Your pain may not be directly related to your lifting strategy.

 

 

Could you have pain with forward bending? Absolutely.

Is bending at the lumbar spine an increased risk for pain or injury? In the vast majority of situations, no.

If I have pain with forward bending, is it bad to temporarily limit doing so? Not at all.

Should I fear bending at the spine with or without pain or injury? No. Being fearful of flexing/moving your spine is actually a stronger predictor of disability and back pain.

 

Work on moving through your spine, after all it’s what it is designed to do! Choose comfortable movements and gain confidence over time, then build up your strength gradually with resistance training – try and not to push too fast, we want nice, healthy adaptation! Give your body time to adapt, back pain is not quick fix sometimes but you are resilient and with healthy, normal movements and some patience, you will be okay.

Disorders of the Achilles Tendon

Basic Anatomy

The Achilles tendon is the largest tendon in the human-body. It is a band of tissue that connects your calf muscles to your heel bone (calcaneus). This tendon primarily facilitates general mobility such as walking, running, climbing stairs, jumping, and standing on your tip toes, by helping to raise the heel off the ground.

 

 

Common Achilles Pathology

Achilles tendinitis and tendinosis are two common disorders and are typically classified as overuse injuries.

Achilles tendonitis involves inflammation of the Achilles tendon. Inflammation is the body’s natural response to injury or disease, and often causes swelling, pain, or irritation. This inflammation is typically short-lived. Over time, if this is left resolved, the condition may progress to degeneration of the tendon- Achilles tendinosis, in which case, the tendon loses its organized structure and is likely to develop microscopic tears.

There are two types of Achilles tendonitis and it is based on which part of the tendon is inflamed:

  • Insertional Achilles tendonitis affects the lower portion of your tendon where it attaches to your heel bone.
  • Non-insertional Achilles tendonitis involves fibres in the middle portion of the tendon and tends to affect younger people who are active.

In both non-insertional and insertional Achilles tendinitis, damaged tendon fibres may also calcify (harden) and often bone spurs (extra bone growth) develop with insertional Achilles tendinitis. Achilles tendonitis may also increase your risk of sustaining an Achilles tendon rupture (tear).

Causes

Typically referred to as “overuse” conditions, Achilles tendonitis and tendinosis are often caused by the sudden increase in repetitive activity involving the Achilles tendon. This can put too much stress on the tendon too quickly, that can then lead to micro-injury of the tendon fibres. Because of this ongoing stress on the Achilles, the body is not able to repair the injured tissue. The structure of this tendon is then modified, resulting in continued pain and other symptoms. The Achilles tendon also has poor blood supply that makes it more susceptible to injury and may make recovery from injury slow.

Common factors that may lead to the development of disorders of the Achilles tendon include:

  • Weak and/or tight calf muscles
  • Rapidly increasing the amount or intensity of exercise within a short span of time
  • Hill climbing or stair climbing exercises
  • Presence of bony spurs in the back of your heel
  • Changes in footwear – especially changing from wearing high-heeled shoes to flat shoes
  • Wearing poor fitting, inappropriate, or worn out shoes during sporting activities
  • Exercising without adequate warm-ups and stretching
  • A sudden sharp movement which causes the calf muscles to contract and the stress on the Achilles tendon to be increased. This can cause the tendon fibres to tear.
  • Excessive mobility
  • Poor feet positioning and biomechanics (excessive pronation and flattening of the arches of the foot)

 

Symptoms

Achilles tendon pain: Causes. when to see a doctor, and treatment

 

Common symptoms include:

  • Pain and stiffness along the Achilles tendon especially first thing in the morning
  • Pain along the tendon or back of the heel that worsens with activity
  • Severe pain the day after exercising
  • Visible thickening of the tendon
  • Tenderness to touch
  • Bone spur
  • Swelling that is present all the time and gets worse throughout the day with activity

If you have experienced a sudden “pop” in the back of your calf or heel, you may have torn your Achilles tendon. Please seek urgent medical attention if you think you may have torn your tendon.

Diagnosis

If Achilles tendonitis or tendinosis is suspected, please deter from any activity or exercise which causes the pain. It is advisable to see your doctor or physiotherapist as soon as possible so that an accurate diagnosis may be made and appropriate treatment recommended.

You will be asked about the nature and duration of your symptoms and the medical professional assessing you will have a look at your foot and ankle. Ultrasound scanning may be used to evaluate the damage to the tendon and/or surrounding structures.

An MRI may be recommended if symptoms persist. X-rays may also be taken to rule out other disorders which may cause symptoms like Achilles tendonitis and tendinosis.

Achilles Tendonitis - Ankle - Conditions - Musculoskeletal - What We Treat  - Physio.co.ukHow to Treat Achilles Tendinopathy with Physical Therapy -  prohealthcareproducts.com

Treatment

Treatment will depend on the nature, severity, and length of the injury. Generally speaking, the longer the symptoms are present before treatment commences, the longer the timeframe until full recovery is attained.  Full recovery may take between three and nine months.

Initial treatment options in the early stages may include:

  • Rest – to avoid further injury to the area
  • Ice – to reduce inflammation
  • Elevation – to reduce swelling
  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to reduce pain and inflammation.

 How physiotherapy can help:

Physiotherapy typically focuses on two main areas: treatment and rehabilitation. Treatment may entail massage, shockwave therapy, acupuncture, gait re-education, and gentle stretching, whereas, rehabilitation predominantly entails strengthening of the Achilles and surrounding musculature.

Strengthening of the muscles surrounding the Achilles tendon facilitates healing in the tendon itself. Strengthening is attained through the utilization of specific exercises, that will be taught by your physiotherapist. It is common for the rehabilitation programme to take up to three months.

 

Exercises