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Your first step to recovery

Osteoporosis

 

Osteoporosis is a condition which results in weak and brittle bones- to such degree that a fall or even mild stresses like coughing or bending over may result in a fracture. Bones are living tissues which are continually being broken down and replaced. However, your bones become osteoporotic when the formation of new bone does not keep up with the loss of old bone. This condition typically develops over time without any pain or other major symptoms, and is generally not diagnosed until you have sustained a fracture. The hip, pelvis, upper arm, spine and wrists are the most common structures affected by osteoporosis- related fractures.

 

 

How do you know if you have Osteoporosis?

 

Because there are no obvious early warning signs and symptoms, it is difficult to pre-diagnose osteoporosis. You may be unaware that you have this condition perhaps till you have one of the following:

  • Sustained a fracture from an incident more easily than you should have- like a simple fall or a bump
  • A decrease in the height of your spinal vertebrae over time
  • Change in posture – stooping or bending forwards
  • Back pain, due to a fractured or collapsed vertebra

Please see your doctor if you experience the following:

  • If you are over the age of 50 and have sustained a fracture
  • Sustained a spine, wrist, or hip for the first time
  • Sustained a fracture more easily than you should have (a simple fall or after a slight bump)

 

Risk factors

Key factors which may increase your risk of developing osteoporosis include:

  • Females- particularly post-menopausal Caucasian and Asian women
  • Over the age of 50
  • Excessive consumption of caffeine or alcohol
  • Smoking
  • Having a smaller or petite body frame
  • Poor physical activity levels and leading a very sedentary lifestyle
  • Family history of osteoporosis
  • Having low levels of vitamin D and poor dietary calcium intake
  • Decreasing levels of testosterone with ageing in men
  • Estrogen deficiency in women (irregular periods, early (before turning 40) or post-menopausal, surgical removal of the ovaries)
  • Use of long-term medication such as thyroid and epilepsy medications, corticosteroids
  • Having medical conditions such as gastrointestinal diseases; endocrine diseases; rheumatoid arthritis; cancer; and blood disorders

 

 

How will you be diagnosed?

Your doctor will review your signs and symptoms, family and medical history. You may be referred on for a specialized X-ray or CT scan to evaluate the bone density to help diagnose osteoporosis. Your bone density will be classified by comparing it to the typical bone density for a person of equivalent gender, size, and age.

 

 

How is Osteoporosis treated?

The treatment pathway chosen for the management of this condition is dependent on results of your bone density scan, gender, age, medical history and severity of the condition. Potential treatments for osteoporosis may include exercise, making positive lifestyle changes, vitamin and mineral supplements, and medications. Please consult your doctor for appropriate advice and treatment options.

 

 

How can Physiotherapy help?

 

Your physiotherapist will help you strengthen your bones and your muscles through a personalized and graduated rehabilitation program. Components of this rehabilitation program may include weightbearing aerobic exercises, resistance training using free weights/resistance bands/bodyweight resistance, and exercises to enhance posture, balance and body strength. Your physiotherapist will work with you to find activities that suit your needs and as per your physical activity level.

 

 

We Want You To Understand Your Pain

What is pain?

Pain is the brain giving out a message to protect you . It is part of our bodies natural defense system.

When an event occurs that we need protecting from, our brains response is to increase our pain. Living things detect and respond to stimulus. | Characteristics of living  things, Natural hairstyles for kids, Characteristics

Example: Putting a hand on a hot pan. You feel pain, which is the brain giving you a warning signal to move your hand away.

Pain is all about protection, never about measuring the condition of the tissues in the body.

In this instance we experience a high level of pain to prevent a bigger injury eg. causing a burn.

This is our bodies way of protecting us

So what is happening in our brain?

  • We as human beings are amazingly adaptable. The longer we have pain, the longer our brains learn to produce pain.

  • It hurts in the tissues (back, knee, hand), but the problem is in the nervous system. There is an adaptation within our nervous system.

Long term pain or Chronic pain

Chronic pain is defined as persistent or recurrent pain lasting longer than 3 months

If you have had pain for more than 3 months, your system is now overprotective. Your nervous system and immune systems have learnt.

 

Movement is medicine: why exercise therapy reduces chronic pain - Hinge  Health

 

  • With chronic pain the buffer size is increased- therefore pain comes on quicker than before.

  • You get pain when you are not anywhere near being in danger.

Management of chronic pain:

  • Identify why your brain is protecting you – fear, anxiety, quality of movement, posture, injury

  • Reduce the size of your buffer – desensitization, reassurance, progressive load management

  • Understand your pain- know that it may not go completely, but can become more manageable

Medication:

  • Depending on the type of pain you are experiencing, painkillers/NSAID’s may be beneficial in the short term – speak to your GP/pharmacist

  • Note: the research does not show good outcomes for the long-term use of medication to treat chronic pain.

Occupational Therapy:

  • If you have been off work because of your pain – try to return to work asap. An OT can discuss and plan a gradual return to work plan for you

  • They can also assist by providing aids to helps with daily tasks such as getting out of bed, or putting on shoes.

Physiotherapy:

  • There is no quick fix for persistent pain. We can help guide you along your journey to recovery

  • With persistence and hard work you can learn to adapt and cope with your pain

  • Movement is king – it is critical for retraining the system

  • Movement gradually suppresses the pain system.

  • Finding any form of exercise or movement that you enjoy and gradually increasing the volume over time

  • Moving regularly- on your good days and your bad days

Self Help:

  • Meditation or mindfulness – Apps such as Headspace or Calm are easy to use and will guide you through the process

  • The Pain ToolKit